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Chinese scientists find carbon dioxide can be stored in deep-sea sediments


Chinese researchers found that carbon dioxide can be stored in deep-sea sediments stably and safely.

The study, published on Wednesday in the journal Science Advances, revealed that the negative buoyancy effect caused by high density of liquid carbon dioxide, along with the formation of carbon dioxide hydrate, could provide an effective barrier to prevent the upward flow of the injected carbon dioxide.

Carbon capture and storage is considered to be a promising option to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of human-caused carbon dioxide and mitigate climate change.

Although conventional proposals for geologic sequestration, including injection into deep saline aquifers, oil and gas fields, and deep coal seams are prospective, the stored carbon dioxide is so buoyant that it may escape from permeable pathways into the atmosphere, according to the study.

Carbon sequestration in deep-sea sediments could take advantage of the high pressure and low temperature of subsea sediments, according to the study.